Laser Surgeries

Laser surgery is a fairly popular way to help drain aqueous from the eye in patients with glaucoma to improve intraocular pressure, and is often performed as an intermediate step between medication and traditional glaucoma surgery. A laser beam of intense light is aimed at the eye in order to open up clogged tubes in the eye to drain fluid. It can take a few weeks before results are noticeable. It is a fairly quick outpatient procedure that requires local anesthesia. Following surgery, patients may experience inflammation, light sensitivity, blurriness, scratchiness, or soreness in the eye a few days after the procedure. Patients may return to their everyday activities the following day.

 

Diode Laser

Diode Laser is usually recommended after other surgeries have failed. The laser is used to destroy part of the ciliary body to decrease fluid production and intraocular pressure. During the procedure, the laser probe is directed into the eye, and travels through the sclera to the ciliary body which is destroyed enough to reduce intraocular pressure but still produces some aqueous liquid.


Lateral Peripheral Iridotomy (LPI)

Lateral Peripheral Iridotomy (LPI) is a procedure for treating patients with acute or chronic angle-closure glaucoma. With a laser, a hole will be made on the outer edge of the iris leading to an opening in the angle. The angle is widened, and the trabecular meshwork is exposed to increase fluid outflow. The procedure will not improve vision, but will prevent any further vision loss from glaucoma.

 

Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (LT)

Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty, or SLT, is a form of laser surgery used to treat patients with open-angle glaucoma when eye drop medications are not sufficiently working. During the procedure, a laser will be applied to the trabecular meshwork to create a tiny hole. The hole will facilitate fluid outflow, decreasing eye pressure.



 

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